Changes to Remote Solve Manager (RSM) at ANSYS R18.0, for Remote Number Crunching

As you may be aware (and even if you did not know!), there are quite a few changes made to RSM at R18.0.

The premise behind these changes is to have RSM provide a simple scheduling tool for customers that don’t need a full-blown cluster installation. This is good for a user environment with a small pool of simulation users. The advantage is that it is straight forward to deploy and use.

When a company starts evolving into using simulation in more facets of design, or when the number of users increases, 3rd party schedulers are suggested for deployment. Examples of 3rd party schedulers are Windows HPC, PBS Pro, and LSF. (For information on supported schedulers and other aspects of ANSYS software, visit this page.) Continue reading

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Take Advantage of Repeatedly Used Components in CAD by Instance Meshing in ANSYS Mechanical

Repetitive meshing tasks can be a significant portion of the time a user spends setting up an FEA model for simulation. In cases where components are reused multiple times in an assembly, the meshing can be tedious.

Select 20 of the exact same face in a bolt circle to specify the number of elements on an annulus…

Select the 20 bodies that those 20 faces belong to for a mesh method…

What if the number of bodies/faces/even edges is larger? Continue reading

Design of Roll Over Protection Systems and Trailer Rear Impact Guards Using ANSYS Mechanical Energy Absorption Calculations

Many companies use ANSYS to reduce chance of injury and death when an accident occurs such as the overturning of a tractor or the rear impact crash of a car into the back of a trailer. An effective method to minimize danger to vehicle occupants during an accident is to ensure that that the structure absorbs sufficient energy through plastic deformation during the accident impact.

Many vehicles have Roll Over Protection Systems (ROPS) to reduce injury to operators. Figure 1 shows a Bobcat skid steer loader including its ROPS, which is the black cage structure surrounding the driver. Continue reading

The Impossible is Now Routine

Sometimes, during the course of doing what you might have thought was a routine simulation, you realize that you are doing something that didn’t used to be routine.  In fact, it may have been impossible without advances in software and hardware in recent years.

Recently, DRD was conducting stress simulation for a casting assembly from Davis Tool & Die of Fenton, MO. As the geometry was meshed and examined, small details of the casting continued to become evident and additional refinement was needed.  As seen in the images below, the model became quite large. Continue reading

Tricks for Producing Averaged Results for Surfaces or Volumes In ANSYS Mechanical

Occasionally it may be a requirement to report average values of stress or strain from an ANSYS Mechanical analysis. There are tricks to do this either for a group of nodes/elements on a face or elements within a specific volume.

Depending on the requirement, the goal may be to simply report either :

– “Average” stresses on a face (based on nodes)
– “Average” stresses on a face (based on elements)
– “Average” stresses on a volume (based on elements)

Technique 1 : Reporting weighted area average nodal stress Continue reading

Transferring Deformed Geometry Between ANSYS Applications

Often there is a need to export the deformed geometry from ANSYS Mechanical. Possibly to a 3D printer to show to customers, or maybe a new CAD geometry file is needed that can be used for drawings or further design evaluation. Starting with Release 17, Mechanical offers two options for users for doing this task.

Exporting STL (Standard Tessellation Language) files from the deformed results is one option. The STL file may be opened within ANSYS SpaceClaim Direct Modeler and reverse engineered to create deformed solid geometry from the STL facets. Continue reading

Determining the Interior Wall Direction in ANSYS Fluent

Boundaries in ANSYS Fluent can be broken into two groups: external boundaries and internal boundaries.  External boundaries appear on the outer boundary of meshed regions (inlets, outlets, interfaces, etc.), while internal boundaries exist within a conformal mesh (interiors, porous-jumps, fans, etc.).  Internal boundaries are not limited to only residing inside a cell zone (for example they can separate two different cell zones); instead their restriction is simply that the mesh be continuous across them.  There is one boundary type that can be used as either an external or internal boundary: walls.

While external walls are fairly self-explanatory, internal walls are called coupled walls (or two-sided walls) because they are actually formed by a pair of wall boundaries that are by default coupled together.  You most often see coupled walls separating Fluid and Solid cell zones, but they can also be used with as infinitely thin baffles with fluid on both sides.  Each coupled wall pair shows up in the boundary list as a zone and its shadow: one for each side of the wall.  Sometimes it is necessary to set different boundary conditions on either side of the coupled wall.

Continue reading